If you can’t stand the heat …..

There are plenty of reasons in February to get into the kitchen and have a go at rustling up some food for friends and family. So whether it’s a Chinese banquet, some flipping fun or trying to impress a date, this month is a good time to think about kitchen and cooking safety.

Children and cooking

Children love helping out in the kitchen, especially if you are making things like pancakes, but according to RoSPA 67,000 children get injured in kitchen accidents every year. Of these 43,000 are aged between 0-4 years.

  • Try not to hurry and don’t get distracted – this is how most kitchen fires start
  • Use the rear hotplates on the hob and turn pan handles away from the front of the cooker, this reduces the chance of child pulling something hot off the cooker
  • If you are using the oven keep children away. Children can get injured from hot oven doors or from steam and heat as the door is opened
  • Make sure the oven door is closed firmly after you have finished using it
  • Keep hot liquids clear of children and never hold a child while you have a hot drink in your hand. What seems lukewarm to adult can be hot enough to scald a child
  • Look out behind you – children – especially very young children or their toys can easily be a trip hazard in the kitchen
  • Be careful when you are cooking with oil or fats as they can spit and burn you or a child
  • Oil and fat can easily catch fire, careful not to overfill a pan with oil or splash it when you add food
  • If a pan does catch fire don’t try and move it, never use water, turn the heat off if you can, get out and call 999
  • Don’t leave children alone in the kitchen
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Figures from RoSPA say 67,000 children are injured in the kitchen every year

The NHS has useful information about treating scalds and burns.

Caution in the kitchen

The kitchen is the highest fire risk area in the home– up to 60% of fires start in the kitchen.  It’s not only due to the cooking it’s also because this area of the home has a high concentration of domestic appliances.

It’s worth registering your kitchen appliances so you are aware of any safety advice or product recalls. You can register appliances up to 12 years from purchase.

  • Make sure hobs and grills pans are clean, the build up of fat can cause a fire
  • Take care not to lean over hot hobs or gas flames
  • Keep tea towels and cloths away from the cooker and hob
  • Don’t cook if you have been drinking alcohol
  • Take care when cooking with hot oil – it can easily overheat and catch fire
  • Never fill a pan more than one-third full of fat or oil
  • Make sure food is dry before putting it in hot oil
  • If the oil starts to smoke, it’s too hot. Turn off the heat and leave it to cool

Be alarmed

Most people have experienced the smoke alarm going off when cooking. It can be annoying – more annoying than Piers Morgan apparently. It’s not unusual for people to remove the batteries. In 19% of fires where a smoke alarm failed to activate it was because the batteries were dead or had been removed.

If this is the case in your household it may be time to double check you have the right alarms in the right places.

  • Is your smoke alarm too close to the kitchen? If it goes off when you are cooking it might be
  • Consider a heat alarms for the kitchen. These will not be activated by cooking fumes but react to the temperature increase caused by fire
  • You can never have too many smoke or heat detectors, as a minimum you should have one on every level of your home. Consider additional alarms for other rooms especially if there are lots of electrical in the room – such as teens bedroom
  • Help your alarms help you, test them – ideally once a week, replace the batteries once a year unless they are mains connected or a ten year alarm
  • Plan your escape route- just in case
  • Make sure you have the right alarms for your needs. For example if you are hard of hearing you can get alarms which have vibrating pads or flashing lights to alert you

If you need advice take a look at your local fire and rescue service website. Details of UK fire services can be found on the CFOA website. They often have guides and advice, even home safety checklists for you to follow. There will also be details of any services they may offer to help with home safety. This could be anything from arranging a home safety check to an open day event at a local station.

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